Rouge G de Guerlain

In case you haven’t already noticed, a lot of my posts the past few days have been Paris-themed. This is because the internet connection at the hotel was super slow, so I only managed to get one or two posts up, but now that I’m back, I’m making up for my absence with a whole slug of posts about how incredible Paris was.

IMG_5639So, while walking down the Champs-Élysées for the first time, I noticed a Guerlain store. I have heard amazing things about this brand and read raving reviews of some of their products, and I had always wanted to give it a try. While some Guerlain products are available through Sephora, the selection is limited, so I hadn’t really considered ordering anything. But when a giant Guerlain boutique was staring me in the face, I had no choice: I had to go in and have a look.

IMG_5637Well, the store is beautiful. Just beautiful. The best way I could describe it is vibrant elegance. All of the products are displayed in really neat ways, and they are all colour-coordinated, as you can see in the picture on the right. Displays like this one line both walls, with wonderfully friendly sales associates at every turn.

IMG_5682I knew I wanted to try out a Guerlain product, but I had no real idea which one. Since lipstick is my favourite beauty product that I cannot live without, I decided it would be a practical souvenir of my visit to this Guerlain boutique, and would definitely get used. And then I spotted this shade, 68 Gigi, a beautiful vibrant fuchsia.

Features:

  1. Intense colour
  2. Creamy application, almost like lip balm
  3. Rruby powder for radiance
  4. Spheres of hyaluronic acid for smoothed lips
  5. Wild mango butter for hydration
  6. Comes in a jewel lipstick compact
  7. Optional engraving of lipstick compact

Shades: There are 29 Rouge G de Guerlain exceptional complete lip colour shades, ranging from soft pinks, to bright reds, to even tawny purples. However, one of these shades, 68 Gigi is exclusive to this Champs-Élysées address, meaning it cannot be bought online or in any other Guerlain store.

IMG_5683Each one of these lipsticks comes in a jewel compact, which opens by pulling on the end, revealing a little concealed mirror, with the lipstick sliding out the side. From there, the lipstick just turns up normally. The mirror is super handy for on-the-go application, and for a quick check up on coverage throughout the day.

IMG_5680I am in love with the jewel lipstick compact. A cool fun fact is that the case was designed by Lorenz Bäumer, the most talented jeweler from the Place Vendôme in Paris. The case makes lipstick feel more like an accessory than a simple cosmetic product. The 68 Gigi comes with the option of having the traditional lipstick compact or an exclusive one with 68 on it, which is the one I opted for. And, best of all, you can have the compact engraved. That’s right. Every Saturday, this store has an engraver on staff who will engrave your name, initials, or anything else you’d like into the side of the compact. Now that is what I call personalizing a lipstick.

IMG_5672IMG_5674Guerlain appears to be a master of classy packaging. The lipstick compact comes nestled in a beautiful little, white box, which is tucked away in a chic little Guerlain bag with some product samples, and tied up with pretty red ribbon.

All in all, this is most definitely my favourite beauty souvenir of this trip to Paris, and it has given me high expectations for the rest of Guerlain’s products that I now want to try.

Have you tried any Guerlain products??? Which ones did you like???

Thank you for stopping by, and I hope you have a lovely day 🙂 🙂

Advertisements

The Perfect Paris Travel Book

IMG_6047Before leaving for Paris, I read numerous travel guides, and pored over maps of the arrondissements and the metro. I made lists of what I wanted to see most, and planned out what I could see on which days to limit travel time and maximize fun. But then I got to Paris and stumbled into Colette, one of the weirdest stores I have ever been in. With booming music, people everywhere, and a host of random products with no concrete theme, it was unlike any store I had seen. From Hello Kitty Polaroid cameras, to a wall of magazines I had never heard of, to office supplies, to clothes, to candy and keychains, Colette had it all.

Pages 22-23
Pages 22-23

Finding my comfort zone in the notebook and stationary section, I came across the book This is my Paris by Marie Bashkirtseff, with text and compilation by Petra de Hamer. Along the lines of the Wreck my Journal concept, this book is touted as a “travel diary, activity book, and city guide in one”. It has everything from beautiful and quirky illustrations of Paris’s sights, to lists of must-see stores and restaurants, to blank pages for lists of things to see and do, to pages to tape business cards and tickets, and even pages of recipes for classic French foods and beverages. Essentially this book provides the framework of a trip scrapbook; all you have to do is add in whatever you want.

I saved up everything from my trip in a manilla envelope, and now that I’m home, I will be filling it all out and taping everything in. I would recommend purchasing this book before leaving for Paris though, because some pages are meant for pre-trip planning. On these ones, I am going to attach all of my lists, but it would have been nice to list things directly in the book.

If this type of books is interesting to you, there is also a This is my Berlin book, and possibly more.

So here’s a question for you: how do you document your travels???

Thank you for stopping by, and I hope you have a lovely day ☺ ☺

Shakespeare and Company Book Haul

IMG_5919Shakespeare and Company was at the top of my Places to Visit in Paris list. This bookstore has been featured in numerous movies, such as Julie and Julia and Midnight in Paris, and has an illustrious history.

Shakespeare and Company is in fact the name of two bookstores. The first was opened by Sylvia Beach in 1919 at 8 rue Dupuytren, and then moved to a larger building at 12 rue de l’Odéon in 1922. This bookstore was popular with writers like Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, Ford Madox Ford, and James Joyce. However, this bookstore closed in 1940 during the German occupation of Paris and never re-opened. An American ex-serviceman named George Whitman opened the second bookstore bearing this name in 1951 at 37 rue de la Bûcherie. Originally, it was named “Le Mistral,” but was renamed Shakespeare and Company in 1964 as a tribute to Sylvia Beach’s bookstore after her death.

Finding this bookstore though was quite tricky. I ended up wandering the Latin Quarter, Saint Gérmain des Près, and even picking up a Despicable Me Minions puzzle in the process of trying to find it. When I finally found it, it turns out I had essentially passed it at least three times, but the road it is on is so inconspicuous that I kept walking by it. So for any of you who go to Paris and want to see this bookstore, here’s a really simple way to find it: stand with your back to the front of Notre Dame, walk forward towards the road, turn left and cross the bridge, then turn down the first little road you see called Rue de la Bucherie; from there you will see the green awnings.

IMG_5922This bookstore has two floors. The ground floor has new books available for purchase, while the upper floor has books available to be read in the store but not bought, along with couches and chairs for reading, and an adorable little nook with a typewriter that visitors have left notes and quotes in. Not to mention there appears to be a resident cat that lives on the upper floor of the store. It doesn’t get much better than that.

IMG_5924

What I really liked about this bookshop was the stairs leading up to the second floor. Each stair has part of a Hafiz quote painted on them. The full quote is:

“I wish I could show you when you are lonely or in darkness the astounding light of your own being.”

Along the right side of the stairs on the other side of the banister are diagonal shelves with more books sitting on them, along with various box sets of postcards, such as those with previous covers of The New Yorker on them.

20150903-122948.jpgAnother thing that makes this bookstore unique is that any books purchased there are made  extra special with a Shakespeare and Company stamp to mark them as souvenirs of the visit. Of course you can opt out of having your books stamped, but I think it is a really nice way to remember where they are from.

Needless to say, I picked up a few books, so I thought I would show you them here.

IMG_6049

IMG_6050The first book is The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger. I have a mini collection of copies of this novel, and I had never seen this edition before, so I wanted to add it to my bookshelf. Of course this means I will read it again, but I can never read it too many times. I always find something new in the story.

IMG_6052The next book I bought is Three Early Stories, also by Salinger. It contains “The Young Folks,” “Go See Eddie,” and “Once A Week Won’t Kill You.” Compiled into a book in 2014 by the Devault-Graves Agency, these short stories were originally published independently, “Young Folks” in Story magazine in 1940, “Go See Eddie” in University of Kansas City Review in December 1940, and “Once A Week Won’t Kill You” in Story magazine in November-December of 1944. I have never read any of these short stories before, so I am super excited to sit down in my reading nook with my cat and a cup of hot chocolate and delve into them.

IMG_6051The last Salinger book I picked up is For Esme–With Love and Squalor. This is a collection of nine of Salinger’s short stories, some of which I have read like “A Perfect Day for Bananafish,” and others I have not. I have a copy of these stories compiled into a book of another title, Nine Stories, but I have yet to even crack the spine. That book came in a collector box set of all of Salinger’s works that I received as a gift from my French 11 teacher before he retired. He was, and still is a remarkable person, and we shared a passion for books. Before French class started, I would get there early and we would talk about what we had been reading and recommend books to one another. With a copy of these short stories that I can now read, I am looking forward to reading the ones I didn’t read from printed versions from my French teacher.

IMG_6053The final book I purchased is Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast. Firstly, because it is about Paris. And secondly, it mentions the Shakespeare and Company bookstore in chapter 3:

In those days there was no money to buy books. Books you borrowed from the rental library of Shakespeare and Company, which was the library and bookstore of Sylvia Beach at 12 Rue de l’Odéon. On a cold windswept street, this was a lovely, warm, cheerful place with a big stove in winter, tables and shelves of books, new books in the window, and photographs on the wall of famous writers both dead and living. The photographs all looked like snapshots and even the dead writers looked as though they had really been alive.

I opted for the restored edition, as it includes two sections of photos, one of photos of some of Hemingway’s handwritten manuscript pages, and the other of photos of people, such as Hemingway as a young man, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, and Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald. There is even a picture of Hemingway and Sylvia Beach in front of her bookshop Shakespeare and Company. And a picture of the interior of the bookshop, which is similar to how it looks today. A Moveable Feast, Hemingway’s last novel, was published posthumously in 1964, with changes made to the text prior to publishing. This restored edition, however, is the original manuscript as Hemingway wrote it to be published. This edition also has a personal forward by Hemingway’s only surviving son, Patrick Hemingway. Plus, the introduction to this edition was written by Seán Hemingway, the editor and grandson of the author. So if you’re a Hemingway fan, I would seriously recommend picking up a copy of this restored edition.

I would have picked up many more books, but they are deceivingly heavy, and I could only fit so many in my suitcase. The good thing though is that this bookstore has a website, which I recommend you check out, because it shows all the books they have there, new, used, and rare, along with book boxes that can be ordered online. I am seriously considering ordering the classics book box just to see which books are randomly included in it. It’ll be like being back there only I won’t have to worry about weighing my suitcase in the airport.

Have you visited this bookstore before? What books did you bring home?

Thank you for stopping by, and I hope you have a lovely day 🙂 🙂

Disneyland Paris

When planning out this Paris trip, Disneyland Paris was near the top of my list of things I wanted to do. I have been to the Disneyland in California, so I was interested to see which rides were also in this park, and if and how they had been changed. Plus, knowing all the characters would be speaking French was an added bonus.

I did not take as many pictures as I’d like, but I figured the limited number of pictures speaks to how much fun it was. I hope you enjoy 🙂 🙂

Blog logo

Lunch at Tiffany’s

IMG_5137Holly Golightly had breakfast at Tiffany’s; I had lunch. While wandering through Galeries Lafayette the other day, and munching on un pain au chocolat, I stumbled upon a Tiffany and Co. store. I have always wanted one of these little robin egg blue Tiffany bags, but was convinced that nothing in Tiffany’s would be anywhere near my price range. Not so. There really is a wide variety of selection; it’s not all platinum and rare gems. But, of course, there are still the astoundingly priced items that are fun to look at, like the €250000 engagement ring, Some people buy a ring; others buy a house. Ha, talk about perspective. 

Out of all the platinum and shades of gold, I spotted this little Sterling silver infinity ring (on the left), and instantly fell in love with it. I had been eyeing some of the pieces in the infinity collection online, as an advertisement for them had popped up in an internet browser a few weeks back (fate?), but I never thought any of them would be “affordable.” I say that in quotation marks because €190 is still a lot of money, but it makes for a lovely addition to my jewelry case, and a timeless souvenir of my trip to Paris. And it comes in such an adorable little box!!! IMG_5138 What is your favourite souvenir from a trip you have taken???

Blog logo

Pre-Paris Book Haul

20150821-093913.jpgI know, I know, I said no more buying books. But as I mentioned in a previous post, I am off to Paris soon. I am beyond excited about this trip, but unfortunately there is a fair bit of traveling involved before I arrive in Paris. Between the taxis and busses and the 9-hour flight, I just know I will get bored, and nothing quells boredom like a good book.

Now I, like many, love going to the library to check out books. It is a super easy and cost-effective way to read books and try out works by new authors. But I don’t really feel comfortable taking a library book to another continent where it could get lost or damaged. I know there is no such thing as a library version of a permanent record, but in case that does come to exist, I don’t want to be known at my local library branch as the girl who wrecks books and accrues months of late fees because the books go missing.

Hence this pre-Paris book haul was necessary (like how I’m justifying it to myself?) Besides, being stuck on a long-haul flight with a book that isn’t living up to its reputation or is just not sucking you in is a drag.

So, the three books I picked up are Room by Emma Donohue, A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin, and Son by Lois Lowry. I got all of these in paperback because they are lighter and smaller, and therefore easier to pack. I know that I will love these books, which is why I have selected them as the three books that will be coming on my trip with me. I don’t want to have any unnecessary book weight in my carry-on from books that I don’t plan on reading, or am doubtful as to whether or not I will like them.

But who knows, maybe I’ll pick up a few more books while I’m in Paris to weigh down my suitcase on the flight home. Perhaps they’ll even be in French. . .

Blog logo